Teaching

Teaching is a important component of my academic career. Working with students directly on course materials and guiding them through individual research projects is unquestionably one of the greatest sources of enjoyment and fullfillment in working in the academe. My experiences as a student and teacher have revealed that the greatest barriers to the reciprocal processes of teaching and learning arise due to perceived distances. Identifying the relevance of course materials can be challenging for students, yet all too often knowledge is conveyed as intrinsicly-meaningful objective fact. This creates an artificial distance between knowledge and its application in students’ lives, giving the material an imposing quality that impedes the desire to learn.

Further, the intellectual content of the classroom is credited to the work of experts, an unfortunate reality that creates another perceived distance—one that separates the student from the type of person capable of creating and appreciating such knowledge. After all, what hope does the lowly student have of grasping the daunting “genius” of legendary figures such as Einstein? Making matters worse, the inherent relationship of teacher to learner creates a similar, but different perceived separation.

Finally, and for justifiable reasons, each classroom engages in discussion centered around a narrow topic related to a specific discipline. The result is the perception of a fragmented and disparate environment in which the separation of classes at university implies a separation of applicability and interrelatedness outside of the class. My goal as an educator, in addition to the daily activites of teaching, assessing, and providing feedback to students, is to reduce these perceived distances as much as possible.

Current Courses

Spring 2017

Biological Psychology — PSYCH–330

  • The physiological basis of behavior, including the genetics and evolution of behavior, central nervous system anatomy and physiology, research methods, diseases of the brain and associated behavioral alterations and the study of selected systems, e.g., sensorimotor, eating and drinking, sleeping and dreaming, language, and sexual behavior.

  • Prerequisites: PSYCH 110 - Principles of Psychology, SOSCI 210 - Social Science Statistics, SOSCI 220 - Social Science Research Methods.

Cognitive Psychology — PSYCH–370

  • Exploration of theory and research related to the mental processes that characterize human thought. In particular, this course examines the nature of how people acquire, remember, and use knowledge. Topics covered include attention, pattern recognition, memory, language, problem solving and reasoning.

  • Prerequisites: PSYCH 110 - Principles of Psychology, SOSCI 210 - Social Science Statistics, SOSCI 220 - Social Science Research Methods.

Social Media and Self-Surveillance — UC–100

  • Focuses broadly on how social media shapes the way we work and interact with information and relationships in the digital age. Related topics include influences related to social persuasion, group-think, etc. resulting from “hive mind” behaviors online, as well as the social “justice” phenomenon, and its ability to strengthen/weaken social and political movements. Further, content addresses the risks of curated news feeds, including controversial “experiments” conducted by social media platforms. Finally, the prevailing theme throughout will be the overall effect of “free” services (where the user is the product, such as Facebook, Google, Twitter, etc.) on individuals’ privacy and rights, and the cognitive dissonance associated with giving away such sensitive information for the sake of convenience.

Advanced Social Media and Big Data Research — PSYCH 493

  • In this course students will conduct and present research projects related to the topic of social media. Projects will center on how social media shapes the way we work and interact with information and relationships, and how those processes shape us in return.

Past Courses

The following is a list of classes that I have taught in the past.

Biological Psychology — PSYCH–330

  • The physiological basis of behavior, including the genetics and evolution of behavior, central nervous system anatomy and physiology, research methods, diseases of the brain and associated behavioral alterations and the study of selected systems, e.g., sensorimotor, eating and drinking, sleeping and dreaming, language, and sexual behavior.

  • Prerequisites: PSYCH 110 - Principles of Psychology, SOSCI 210 - Social Science Statistics, SOSCI 220 - Social Science Research Methods.

Cognitive Psychology — PSYCH–370

  • Exploration of theory and research related to the mental processes that characterize human thought. In particular, this course examines the nature of how people acquire, remember, and use knowledge. Topics covered include attention, pattern recognition, memory, language, problem solving and reasoning.

  • Prerequisites: PSYCH 110 - Principles of Psychology, SOSCI 210 - Social Science Statistics, SOSCI 220 - Social Science Research Methods.

Introduction to Psychology — PSYCH–1100

  • (2009–2014), The Ohio State University. (12 sections total)
  • A prerequisite to advanced courses; a broad survey of psychological science. Application of the scientific method to the empirical study of behavior with emphasis on individual and cultural differences.

Memory & Cognition — PSYCH 3312

  • (2012), The Ohio State University (guest lecturer for 3 weeks)
  • An introduction to the experimental study of human memory and cognition.

Principles of Psychology — PSYCH–110

  • An introduction to psychology: biopsychology, sensation/perception, learning, memory, language, thought, motivation, personality, emotion, stress, development, social psychology and psychological disorders and therapies. Attention is given to the methodology of the social sciences.

Social Science Research Methods — SOSCI–220

  • Students learn research logic, strategies, issues in the social sciences, including qualitative and quantitative techniques, program evaluation, and survey, correlational, experimental, quasi-experimental, single subject, and field research designs. Students develop and test research hypotheses and identify and operationally define research variables, design research studies, draw valid conclusions, and write research reports following a professional style.

  • Prerequisites: PSYCH 110 - Principles of Psychology, SOC 110 - Principles of Sociology, SOSCI 210 - Social Science Statistics.

Social Sciences Statistics — SOSCI–210

  • Fulfills Quantitative Reasoning Goal. A study of descriptive and inferential statistics, including correlation, regression and hypothesis testing using the t, F and chi square tests. Not open to students who have credit for MATH 215.

  • Prerequisites: PSYCH 110 or SOC 110, a college algebra course or its equivalent (MATH 110, MATH 120, MATH–130, MATH 220, MATH 230, or MATH 231).